Tag Archives: Boqueron

Suited Up And Ready To Ride

Justin, who was supposed to be buying the motorcycle left his passport over in Bocas del Toro, so technically I sold the bike to his girlfriend, Brandy. We went over to Bugaba and worked out all the paperwork. Fortunately there was a young lady who handles titles and registration for some care dealership standing behind us and she helped us fill out the two forms we needed to complete (in Spanish, of course.) I’m sure we could have made it on our own, but the line behind us was growing longer by the minute so the lady was a great help…

Here’s Justin all suited up and ready to ride. They plan on going to spend the night in Boquete and then ride the bike over to Bocas del Toro in the morning.

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SOLD!

Heading over to Bugaba this morning to transfer title on the motorcycle. Got close to my asking price so I’m satisfied. Of course the money is already gone. I have some massive dental work that needs to be done. Fortunately it’s a LOT less expensive here than in the States, but it’s still a serious chunk of change.

Home Safe 3

I just never used it like I thought I was going to. There were roads I’d pass on the bus going to and from David and Bugaba and wonder what was down them. I did ride down several of them and the answer was…not much.

 

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Getting Ready For Christmas

‘Tis the season to be jolly and I’m getting into the groove here in Boquerón. I spent all weekend getting my Christmas tree up, but it was certainly worth the effort.

got-my-tree-up

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An Honor

Back the last week in September our little community of Boquerón celebrated the feast day of its patron saint San Miguel. A little old man, Jorge Luis Ríos, who lives just up the main road from me said he was putting together a small magazine and he wanted me to write an article for it. He and I talk a couple of times a week and he knows that I was a newspaper reporter way, way, way back, and I lent him the Spanish version of my book which he said he enjoyed. He must have because every time we are on the bus together going in to David (DahVEED) he tells everyone around that I’ve written a book.. Sr. Ríos is a radio journalist reporting on farm news for Radio Chiriquí. So, I gave him about a thousand words in a little article titled “Mi Boquerón” (My Boquerón). He produced a 14-page magazine (revista in Spanish).

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My story was extremely heavily edited, but parts of it were quoted…

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On the facing page is a national hero here in Panama and the Pride of Boquerón, without a doubt…

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It’s an honor to be in such good company and definitely an honor to appear as the only extranjero (foreigner) in this community’s celebration of their year. I think it’s called assimilation.

 

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Thinking Outside The Box

A common complaint here, especially among the expat population that huddles, incestuously, in the mountain peaks and valleys around Boquete above the city of David, is about horrible, or nearly non-existent, customer service. In the almost five years I’ve lived here I haven’t found that to be true at all, and today was an example of the good customer service. Comparable to good customer service anywhere. (Perhaps it has something to do with the fact that I try my best to speak Spanish with the Panamanians I have to deal with.) Here’s what happened:

Last month I went into David to pay my cable and internet service bill. I wanted to delete the television portion of the service since my t.v. died and I decided I didn’t want to buy a replacement. The girl I dealt with at the Cable Onda office played around on the computer keyboard for a while and said the service had been discontinued and that I needed to bring in the t.v. modem. I asked if it would be okay to wait until the next billing cycle to do that instead of having to make a special trip back to their downtown office. She said it would be fine. But that the internet portion of the bill would be $42.36 since I had signed up for a “package deal” that combined t.v., internet for a monthly total of $50.36. That was all right with me since before I signed on to Cable Onda’s five meg cable internet I had been paying $45 and change for Claro’s USB modem internet which, on a good day, provided me with half a meg speed. What  I’d save not having to pay for the t.v. meant that I’d be getting almost two months of free internet service. I figured I was ahead of the game.

Friday I received my monthly bill and saw that they were still billing me the full $50.36. This morning I put the modem in my knapsack and went to the Cable Onda office. I asked to speak to one of the customer service reps. This time I ended up with a young gentleman who insisted on speaking English even after I’d explained my situation to him in Spanish. He said I’d done it well, but he liked the opportunity to use his English whenever possible. He explained that with the package I had I paid $21.12/month for the television access and $29.24 for the internet. But internet alone was, as I said before, $42.36. HOWEVER, even though I wasn’t going to buy a new t.v. and use the service, he could sign me into another package in which I’d be subscribed to just Panama access to local television shows and that only costs $6.88/month but would leave the internet payment at $29.24 for a grand total of $36.12. A savings of $14.24 a month from what I had been paying and saving $170.88 over a year. Another way of looking at it is, I’d also be paying $6.24 a month LESS than subscribing to internet alone OR saving $74.88 over the year. That’s like getting two months FREE internet service.

He spent some time clicking around on his computer and said I’d only have to pay the $36.10 today and not the $50.36.

Now THAT’S customer service. Do I think the girl last month was trying to rip off the gringo? No, not at all. She was thinking linearly. The book says if someone comes in off the street and wants to subscribe to internet service by itself it costs THIS MUCH. I’m sure customer service reps in a similar situation in the States would have done exactly what she did. I probably would have done the same thing had I been sitting on her side of the desk last month. I was lucky today to get someone who thinks outside the box and who knows that giving the customer a little lagniappe, as it were, results in a satisfied customer. And another thing to consider…the pay here in Panama sucks. The girl and the guy will be lucky if they GROSS $125.00 or $150.00 a week! At those prices you can’t expect them to be doing a lot of thinking at all. But sometimes you just get lucky.

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Moved To The Dark Side

I haven’t posted in the last week partially because I didn’t have anything I wanted to say, though I do have a couple of drafts that aren’t completed. (That’s kind of a silly statement when you consider that almost all of my posts are, essentially, first drafts quickly scanned for spelling errors. ) Ad another reason I didn’t post was because my computer died. Kaput. Shit the bed. Won’t start! Finished. Washed up. I could go on, but I won’t.

Except for my very first computer, every one I’ve owned has been a Hewlitt -Packard (anyone remember the old Packard cars?) whether a desk top or a notebook. And, by and large, I’ve been happy with them. When using them I would often remember a phone conversation I had back in 1974 when I was working as a head hunter in Chicago. We recruited high-end systems analysts and heads of IT departments. This was back in the days when computers were so huge they took up entire floors of big buildings and were attended by white-coated acolytes.

I really didn’t know squat about computers or what the jobs of the people I was talking to actually entailed. But I knew certain buzz words that we were supposed to ask and that was actually enough.

One day I blind-called a systems analyst at Hewlitt-Packard, and during our conversation I asked what projects he was currently working on. He got real excited and said, “We’re working on building ‘mini computers.'”

“What the hell are those?” I asked.

“They’re computers people will have on their desks.”

“Yeah, right,” I thought. “Call me in a couple of years and let me know how that worked out for ya.”

I came down here to Panama with two HP notebooks. One was on its last legs but I figured it could be a backup if my main one went belly up. About a year later they were both toast and I went into David and bought a third notebook. It, too, was an HP, mainly because it was the only one in three stores that was reasonably priced and also had an English keyboard. Remember, this is a Spanish speaking country so naturally Spanish keyboards predominate. They’re slightly different. For example, on the English keyboard the key with the colon and semi-colon is now the Ñ key. The semi-colon sits to the right of the letter M and the colon key is just to the right of that. There are also three-key acrobatics needed to get the @ symbol up and running instead of simply the Shift and #2 keys.

Everything worked fine until last Saturday. Then it was impossible to get the thing to start. Parts of files somewhere were missing, etc., etc. I’m not going to get into what I tried to do to repair things using the defunct spares.

So, on Sunday morning I went into David looking for a replacement for the replacement that replaced…well you get the picture. However, this time there wasn’t an English keyboard to be found around Plaza Terronal where there are three stores selling computers. Now, I know that if I went to the Pricesmart (Panama’s answer to Wally World) I could probably get one, but the last time I was computer shopping the exact same model I eventually bought at Panafoto was priced over $200 more than the one I bought.

When I made a sad face about the lack of an English keyboard model the computer geek sales robot said that going into a computer’s it was possible to select what language you wanted the Spanish keyboard to resemble. For instance, I could turn the Spanish keyboard into an English one with a couple of clicks.

Cool!

Then there was the problem that all the Windows-based computers were loaded with the universally panned and hated Windows 8 operating system. Funny, the week before I’d read a story about how the world was anxiously awaiting Window 10 (no one said anything about why there was no Windows 9, though).

There were three long shelves full of Toshiba, HP, Sony and other PC notebooks and I played around with the Windows 8 displays and could see why people didn’t like it, and not knowing, and not being able to be computerless for who knows how long before Windows 10 comes out, I started to eye the meager collection of  Apple products. I very much liked the 13″ screen Airbook, especially because it was fairly reasonably priced and I liked that instead of a mechanical hard drive it has a solid state memory. The problem with regular hard drives is that they move and things that move wear out. They also generate a lot of heat because of the whirling discs.

So, I bit the bullet, pulled out my debit card and bought one. I took it home, plugged it in and NOTHING!!! Damned thing wouldn’t start. I figured, okay, the battery needs to be charged before it will start. I left it plugged in for four hours and still nothing.

I was the first civilian through Panafoto’s doors Monday morning. I went around and around with the manager about getting them to swap out the non-working unit with one they had out back. All in Spanish, I might add. No, they had to send the one in my possession to the Apple Store in Panamá as they call the Capitol. They would send it express and I’d have a replacement Wednesday afternoon. Needless to say I was pissed, but had to capitulate after 45 minutes of fruitless arguing.

Wednesday afternoon arrived. Nobody with a computer showed up at my door. I called Panafoto and they apologized, but the torrential downpours currently underway meant it wasn’t going to happen but I was assured that I’d have the replacement “before 12″ the next day. Well, almost. I was just ready to call when two guys from Panafoto showed up at 12:15. We opened the box, pushed the button and Voilà, it worked!

So, here I am with four notebook computers:

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There is definitely a learning curve moving from the PC platform to the Mac way of doing things. It will take a while, but the Airbook is praised as absolutely the best notebook in existence. We’ll see.

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As Close To Free As It Gets

There’s no doubt about it, Panama is filled with a wonderful variety of fruits and vegetables. My friend Omar, in Panama City, or simply Panamá as it’s called here, has been running a series of posts on his blog about a roadside stand near his house where he and his wife buy a lot of their produce: http://epiac1216.wordpress.com/2014/08/12/a-humble-farmers-stand-in-tumba-muerto/

I urge you to go see the wonderful series about this man’s stand and then browse around in Omar’s blog. Remember, when you’re reading it, that Omar is Panamanian born and English is his second language and one he is passionate about.

Anyway, I’ve written about how people in my neighborhood collect the goodies around our barrio: http://onemoregoodadventure.com/2014/06/10/not-free-but-cheap-food/

Now, these stands are all over the place. They’re along the Inter American Hwy, they’re on the city streets of downtown David, and in several kiosks around the bus terminal. I went to the supermarket El Rey, yesterday, and one of the things I wanted was some tomatoes. The ones there were horrible and I didn’t buy any. Today, at the bus station I bought a bag of pibá still hot from being cooked, and a bag of wonderfully ripe plum tomatoes. They were a buck a bag.

Today's bargains

A word about the fan, which I also bought today. Most, but not all, of the buses running from Boquerón into the city are air conditioned. And it gets hot in David, believe me. More so than here where I live, and definitely scorching compared to places like Boquete and Potrerillos Arriba up in the mountains. And even the air conditioned buses often don’t keep the a/c on when they’re waiting for passengers in the terminal. The non a/c buses (actually they have it but the drivers don’t use it to save on fuel costs) are okay while on the move because the windows are opened and you get the breeze. But sitting in the terminal without a/c you need some way to create your own breeze. Many people use a newspaper or something else.

The other day I saw a girl waiting for the bus to come in and she was using a fan. I asked where she’d bought it and she told me about an Indian (India indian) shop not too far from the terminal. I had to go pay my internet bill this morning so I stopped by the Indian shop and bought 3 fans. This one ($1.99) I’ll keep in my knapsack for when it’s needed.

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